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Segmental chiropractic spinal manipulation does not reduce pain amplification and the associated pain-related brain activity in a capsaicin-heat pain model

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Provencher, B., Northon, S. et Piché, M. (2021). Segmental chiropractic spinal manipulation does not reduce pain amplification and the associated pain-related brain activity in a capsaicin-heat pain model. Frontiers in Pain Research, 2 . ISSN 2673-561X DOI 10.3389/fpain.2021.733727

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Résumé

Musculoskeletal injuries lead to sensitization of nociceptors and primary hyperalgesia (hypersensitivity to painful stimuli). This occurs with back injuries, which are associated with acute pain and increased pain sensitivity at the site of injury. In some cases, back pain persists and leads to central sensitization and chronic pain. Thus, reducing primary hyperalgesia to prevent central sensitization may limit the transition from acute to chronic back pain. It has been shown that spinal manipulation (SM) reduces experimental and clinical pain, but the effect of SM on primary hyperalgesia and hypersensitivity to painful stimuli remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of SM on pain hypersensitivity using a capsaicin-heat pain model. Laser stimulation was used to evoke heat pain and the associated brain activity, which were measured to assess their modulation by SM. Eighty healthy participants were recruited and randomly assigned to one of the four experimental groups: inert cream and no intervention; capsaicin cream and no intervention; capsaicin cream and SM at T7; capsaicin cream and placebo. Inert or capsaicin cream (1%) was applied to the T9 area. SM or placebo were performed 25 min after cream application. A series of laser stimuli were delivered on the area of cream application (1) before cream application, (2) after cream application but before SM or placebo, and (3) after SM or placebo. Capsaicin cream induced a significant increase in laser pain (p < 0.001) and laser-evoked potential amplitude (p < 0.001). However, SM did not decrease the amplification of laser pain or laser-evoked potentials by capsaicin. These results indicate that segmental SM does not reduce pain hypersensitivity and the associated pain-related brain activity in a capsaicin-heat pain model.

Type de document: Article
Mots-clés libres: SMT Pain modulation Spine Pain Manual therapy
Date de dépôt: 14 mars 2022 15:46
Dernière modification: 14 mars 2022 15:46
Version du document déposé: Version officielle de l'éditeur
URI: https://depot-e.uqtr.ca/id/eprint/10012

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