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Intensive care unit clinicians identify many barriers to, and facilitators of, early mobilisation: a qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework

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Anekwe, David E. et Milner, Siobhan C. et Bussières, André et de Marchie, Michel et Spahija, Jadranka (2020). Intensive care unit clinicians identify many barriers to, and facilitators of, early mobilisation: a qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Journal of Physiotherapy . ISSN 1836-9553 1836-9561 DOI 10.1016/j.jphys.2020.03.001

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Question: From the perspective of intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians, what are the barriers to and facilitators of implementing early mobilisation? Design: A qualitative study using focus groups, with analysis using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Participants: Physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists and physiotherapists from the ICUs of three university-affiliated hospitals in Montreal, Canada. Methods: Four focus group meetings were conducted with 33 participating ICU clinicians. Two researchers independently performed thematic content analysis on verbatim transcriptions of the audio recordings using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Results: Data saturation was reached after the third focus group. Thirty-six barriers were categorised in 13 domains of the Theoretical Domains Framework. The key barriers to early mobilisation were: lack of conviction and knowledge regarding the available evidence about early mobilisation; lack of attention to the provision of optimal care; poor communication; the unpredictable nature of the ICU; and limited staffing, equipment, time and clinical knowledge. Twenty-five facilitators categorised in ten TDF domains were also identified. These included individual-level facilitators (intrinsic motivation, positive outcome expectations, conscious effort to mobilise early, good planning/coordination, the presence of ICU champions, and expert support by a physiotherapist) and organisational-level facilitators (reminder system, pro-early mobilisation culture, implementation of an early mobilisation protocol, and improved ICU organisation). Conclusions: A broad array of barriers to and facilitators of early mobilisation in the ICU were identified in this study. Clinicians can consider whether these barriers and facilitators are operating in their ICU. These may inform the design of tailored knowledge translation interventions to promote early mobilisation in the ICU.

Type de document: Article
Mots-clés libres: early mobilisation barriers facilitators theoretical domain framework intensive care unit
Date de dépôt: 04 mai 2020 16:56
Dernière modification: 04 mai 2020 16:56
Version du document déposé: Version officielle de l'éditeur
URI: http://depot-e.uqtr.ca/id/eprint/9205

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